Stomvi onstage with classical music

2018-08-08

A list with all the trumpet players in the field of classical music who are official artists of the Stomvi brand.

From the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the first musical instrument workshops began in appear in Nuremberg (Germany), from the hands of goldsmiths and jewelers of the time.

In 1984 a similar episode happened in Valencia (Spain): a 30-year-old jeweler named Vicente Honorato used his professional knowledge and, motivated by some relevant musicians on the Spanish music scene, produced his first trumpet, to which he called Stomvi.

Today, more than 30 years after that trumpet prototype, hundreds of trumpets, trombones and horns are manufactured every year from Vicente Honorato’s factory. They are manufactured with the utmost care and precision, which is why a great number of great trumpet players from the international scene play with these instruments and are proud artists of the Stomvi brand.

So, we wanted to compile a list with all the trumpeters who play Stomvi —for the moment, those of the classical music field, with some cases including the models they use in their daily work, as well as their thoughts about this Spanish brand.

Here we go!



~ Antoine Acquisto (principal trumpet of the Orchestra of the Royal Opera of Wallonie, Belgium)
~ Murilo Anghinoni (principal trumpet of the Community Orchestra of the Campinas State University, and professor at the Baccarelli Institute of São Paulo, Brazil)
~ Germán Asensi (principal trumpet of the Spanish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra)

I have the great pleasure of playing Stomvi trumpets for their sonorous qualities, and above all for their ergonomics that are close to perfection, something that was recognized by the master teacher, Maurice André.

~ Pierre Badel (international soloist, France)
Trumpets: Master Bellflex 27/27, and Titán (4 valves) in Bb and C. Titán rotary in C.
— Piccolo: Master in Bb/A.
— Cornet: Titán in Bb.
— Mouthpieces: C1C and 1¼C Pierre Badel (Bb). 2C, 3C and 1½C Pierre Badel (C). 7PEBR-2 and 5EPBR (piccolo). 3C (cornet). 1C, 2C and 3C (rotary).

~ Maurice Benterfa (principal trumpet of the Perpignan Méditerranée Symphony Orchestra and professor at the Perpignan Méditerranée Community Conservatoire, France)
~ Roberto Bodí (principal trumpet of the Castile and León Symphony Orchestra and professor at the Advanced Conservatory of Music of Salamanca, Spain)

For me, Stomvi is like the best Formula 1 car: it encompasses everything any driver would need to win a race.

~ Fábio Brum (international soloist and principal trumpet of the Brazilian Symphony Orchestra)
Trumpets, cornets and flugelhorn: Titán (4 valves). Mambo Titanio XL in Bb.
— Corno da caccia (copper).

~ Stefan Bumann (trumpet of the Wacken Firefighters, Germany)

From my point of view, making music with Stomvi instruments means having a support at your side that allows you to continue to develop as a musician.

~ Freddy Cárdenas (principal trumpet of the Hannover Federal Police Band and first trumpet of the Orchestra of the An der Elbe Theatre in Hamburg, Germany)
Trumpets: Titán (4 valves) and S3 in Bb. Titán rotary in Bb.
— Cornet and flugelhorn: Titán (4 valves).

~ Alejandro Castañeda (principal trumpet of the Murcia Symphony Orchestra, Spain)
~ José Castellano (trumpet of the Civil Guard Band of Music, Spain)

As a child, I already had a Stomvi instrument that made it very easy for me to play on stage. The sound of these instruments is, what I believe, the European Sound.

~ Ho Chung-Mom (trumpet of the Evergreen Symphony Orchestra, and founder and musical director of the MOMO Trumpet Ensemble and the MOMO Brass Ensemble, Taiwan)
Trumpets: Titán in Bb and C. Elite in Eb/D.
— Piccolo: Combi in Bb/A.

~ Fernando Ciancio (principal trumpet of the Buenos Aires Philharmonic Orchestra, Argentina)

Playing Stomvi instruments allows me to have a range of colors that no other instrument offers.

~ João Pedro Lúcio da Costa Vilão (principal trumpet of the Jalisco Philharmonic Orchestra, Mexico)
Trumpets: Titán 1/27 ML in Bb (copper bell). Titán 1/27 L (copper bell) and Titán 1/27 L in C (4 valves, copper bell). Titán rotary 11,20/29 in C (copper bell). Titán standard/20 and standard/20 M in Eb/D (copper bell).
— Piccolo: Titán in Bb/A (copper bell).
— Cornet: Titán standard L (copper bell).
— Flulgelhorn: Titán (4 valves).
— Mouthpieces: Classic 0,9C (Bb). Classic 1C (C). Classic 2C and 1C (cornet).

~ Jérémy Coquoz (cornet of the 13 étoiles Brass Band, Switzerland)
~ Iván Crespo (trumpet of the Porto Casa da Música Symphony Orchestra, Portugal)

Being part of the Stomvi staff means having a wide range of high-quality work tools, where I can comfortably face all kinds of repertoire.

~ Adán Delgado (principal trumpet of the Spanish National Orchestra and trumpet of the brassONEquintet)
Trumpets: Titán 1/27 (copper bell).

~ Eduardo Díaz (trumpet of the Orchestra of the Community of Madrid, Spain)
~ José Miguel Díaz-Coira (trumpet of the Ferrol Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Miguel Ángel Duart (trumpet of the Santander Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Francisco ‘Pacho’ Flores (international soloist, Spain)
~ Santos Flores (trumpet of the Málaga Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Juan Bautista Font (trumpet of the Valencia Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Joelson de França (trumpet of the Chamber Orchestra of the Mackenzie Presbyterian University of São Paulo, Brazil)
~ Sebastián Gil (international soloist, and professor at the Advanced Conservatory of Music of the Canary Islands, Spain)
~ Alfonso González-Barquín (principal trumpet of the Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra, Belgium, and professor at Musikene, Spain)

Stomvi trumpets allow me to facilitate all my musical ideas I want to make. It is a luxury to be able to play them and learn from the advice and dreams of Vicente Honorato. To the whole Stomvi family: thank you, thank you and thank you.

~ Luis González (international soloist, principal trumpet of the Cadaqués Orchestra, and professor at Musikene, Spain)
Trumpets: Titán (4 valves) in Bb, C and Eb/D (copper bell).
— Piccolo: Titán in Bb/A (copper bell).
— Cornets: Titán Bellflex in Bb. Titán (4 valves) in Eb/D. Master in C.
— Flugelhorn: Titán (4 valves, copper bell).

~ Manuel Guillén (trumpet of the Almería Municipal Band, Spain)
~ André Henry (international soloist, France / Japan)
~ Raphaël Horrach (young virtuoso, France)
~ Salvador Ibáñez (principal trumpet of the Extremadura Orchestra, Spain)
~ Ronnie Ingle (international soloist and professor at the University of North Dakota, United States)
~ Uwe Kleindienst (international soloist, and professor at the University of Augsburg, Germany)

I play the entire Titan range, which is very good for the demanding work that requires the position of a soloist in an international class orchestra. The wealth and quality of sound, flexibility and timbres that are obtained are very remarkable with Stomvi.

~ Christian Léger (principal trumpet and cornet of the Lyon National Orchestra, and assistant professor at the Lyon Advanced National Conservatory of Music, France)
Trumpets, cornet and flugelhorn: Titán.

~ David Llavata (principal trumpet of the Málaga Philharmonic Orchestra, Spain)
~ Manuel López (trumpeter and educator, Spain)
~ Víctor López (flugelhorn of the Madrid Municipal Symphonic Band, Spain)
~ Javier Lorente (flugelhorn of the Madrid Municipal Symphonic Band, Spain)
~ Antonio Martí (principal trumpet of the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, United States)
~ Antonio Martínez-Cayuelas (trumpet of the Murcia Symphony Orchestra, Spain)
~ Max Matzen (international soloist, professor at the Utah State University and trumpet of the Emerald Brass Quintet, United States)

I play Stomvi instruments because I like their sound, plus they are very versatile and easy to play.

~ Guy Messler (freelance, and professor at the Regional Conservatory of Music of Rouen, France)
Trumpets: Master Bellflex in Bb, C and Eb/D.
— Piccolo: Titán in Bb/A.

~ Juan Carlos Meza (trumpet of the Costa Rica National Symphony Orchestra)

Stomvi's invention of the fourth piston in the whole range of trumpets will go down in the annals of history as the evolution of our instrument. It constitutes the opening of a door to a new immensity of harmonics and sonorous timbres, as well as new repertoire possibilities.

~ Benjamín Moreno (trumpet of the Spanish Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra, and professor at the Progreso Musical Advanced Learning Center)
Trumpets: Titán (4 valves) in Bb and C (copper bell). Titán rotary in C (copper bell).

~ Javier Navasquillo (principal trumpet of the Coahuila Camerata, Mexico)
~ Phill O’Neill (principal trumpet of the Royal Australian Navy Band)
~ Francisco Ortiz (freelance, Spain)
~ Andrés Pandelo (trumpet of the Ferrol Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Jaume Prats (principal flugelhorn of the Valencia Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Juan Quiñones (trumpet of the West Point Band, United States)
~ Pierre-François Remience (trumpet of the Caecilia Wind Orchestra, and member of the Le Clan des Caeciliens quintet, Belgium)
~ Lucienne Renaudin (international soloist, France)
~ Oswaldo Roldán (principal trumpet of the Mérida State Symphony Orchestra, Venezuela)
~ Claude Romailler (flugelhorn of the 13 étoiles Brass Band, Switzerland)
~ Saúl Rubio (trumpet of the Madrid Municipal Symphonic Band, Spain)
~ Stéphane Rudaz (trumpet and flugelhorn of the Valaisia Brass Band, Switzerland)
~ Antonio Sánchez (trumpet of the Almería Municipal Band, Spain)
~ Luigi Santo (freelance, and professor at the Egidio Romualdo Duni State Conservatory of Music of Matera, Italy)
~ Javier Simó (principal trumpet of the Royal Philharmonic of Galicia, Spain)
~ Patricio Soler (trumpet of the Barcelona Municipal Band, Spain)
~ André de Souza (principal trumpet of the Ribeirão Preto Symphony Orchestra, Brazil)
~ Ido-Jan Stalman (principal trumpet of the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra)
~ Steve Stewart (cornet of The Cory Band, Wales, United Kingdom)
~ Veselin Todorov (trumpet of the Madrid Municipal Symphonic Band, Spain)
~ Francisco Gaspar Tomás (trumpet of the Gustav Mahler Youth Orchestra, Austria)
~ Natanael Tomás (trumpet of the Ribeirão Preto Symphony Orchestra, Brazil)
~ Fernando Torija (freelance, Spain)
~ Alejandro Vázquez-Lamela (trumpet of the Ferrol Municipal Band, and trumpet of the Hércules Brass Quintet, Spain)
~ Víctor Vilariño (professor at the La Estrada Middle Conservatory of Music, conductor of the Vilatuxe Band, and trumpet of the Hércules Brass Quintet, Spain)



And not only solo and orchestral performers, but there are also numerous teachers and pedagogues who play Stomvi for all their professional work. They are:

~ Vicente Alberola (professor at the Elche Middle Conservatory, Spain)

I play with the best trumpets in the world, made at home and by my family.

~ Jordi Albert (director and professor at the Jordi Albert Studio Motor Rehabilitation Center of Musicians in Castellón de la Plana, Spain)
Trumpets: Titán 1/27 L in Bb. Titán 1/25 in C.
— Cornet: Titán in Bb.

I have full confidence in my trumpets. No worries.

~ Vicente Alcaide (professor at the Andrés de Vandelvira Advanced Conservatory of Music of Jaén, Spain)
Trumpets: Titán 3/27 and S3 in Bb. Titán 3/23 in C.
— Piccolo: Master Titanium in Bb/A.

~ Ernest Aparisi (professor at the Moncada Middle Conservatory of Music, Spain)
~ Luis Miguel Araya (professor at the University of Central Florida, United States)
~ David Arnaldo (professor at the Odón Alonso Municipal School of Music of La Bañeza, Spain)
~ Raúl Balaguer (professor at the Benaguacil Conservatory of Music, Spain)
~ Francisco Javier Galve (director and professor at the Luis Aramburu School of Music of Vitoria, Spain)
~ Miguel Cerezo (professor at the Middle Conservatory of Music of Cullera, Spain)
~ Miguel Cervera (professor at the Middle Conservatory of Music of Tenerife, Spain)
~ Javier de la Cruz (professor at the Middle Conservatory of Music of Cuenca, Spain)
~ Jean-Christophe Dobrzelewski (professor at the West Chester University, United States)
~ Luis Espert López (professor at the School of Music of Alginet, Spain)
~ Flávio Gabriel (professor at the Federal University of Great Northern River, Brazil)
~ Jorge Giner (professor at the Ángel Barrios Middle Conservatory of Music of Granada, Spain)
~ Jorge Giraldo (professor at the National University of Colombia)
~ Angharad Gonçalves (professor at the Middle Conservatory of Music of Burgos, Spain)
~ Abraham González (professor at the Municipal School of Music of Astorga, Spain)
~ Óscar Grande (professor at the Royal Advanced Conservatory of Music of Madrid, Spain)
~ Raúl Lázaro (professor at the Sebastián Durón Middle Conservatory of Music of Guadalajara, Spain)
~ Alberto López (professor at the Maestro Jaime López Middle Conservatory of Music of Molina de Segura, Spain)
~ Javier Losarcos (professor at the Pablo Sarasate Middle Conservatory of Music of Pamplona, Spain)
~ Agustín Martínez (professor at the Victoria de los Ángeles Middle Conservatory of Music of Madrid, Spain)
~ Fernando Parra (professor at the National University of Colombia)
~ Rafael Ramírez (professor at the Amaniel Middle Conservatory of Music of Madrid, Spain)
~ Rubén Rullo (professor at the Jacinto Guerrero Middle Conservatory of Music of Toledo, Spain)
~ Heraclio Mateus (professor at the Francisco José de Caldas District University of Bogotá, Colombia)
~ José Miguel San Bartolomé (professor at the Arturo Soria Middle Conservatory of Music of Madrid, Spain)
~ Gonzalo Sánchez (professor at the Advanced Conservatory of Music of La Coruña, Spain)
~ Juan Soler-Sellés (professor at the Dionisio Pedro Estarelles School of Music of Ollería, Spain)
~ Bernard Soustrot (professor at the Perpignan Méditerranée Regional Conservatory, France)
~ Luis Toral (director and professor at the Cristóbal Halffter Middle Conservatory of Music of Ponferrada, Spain)
~ Juan Antonio Zapata (professor at the Middle Conservatory of Music of Cartagena, Spain)